Scherer Center Lectures

Agnes Lugo-Ortiz
Associate Professor
Romance Languages and Literatures
University of Chicago
 
Portraiture and Enslavement:
Reflections on a Transatlantic Archive


Thursday, October 30
Classics 110
1010 East 59th Street
4:30pm. Reception to follow.
 
Agnes Lugo-Ortiz recently co-edited Slave Portraiture in the Atlantic World (Cambridge University Press, 2013), the first book to focus on the individualized portrayal of enslaved people from the time of Europe's full engagement with plantation slavery in the sixteenth century to its official abolition in Brazil in 1888. An affiliate of the Center for Latin American Studies, the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, Professor Lugo-Ortiz is a specialist in nineteenth-century Latin American literature and in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Caribbean cultural history. Her work focuses on questions concerning the relationships between cultural production and the formation of modern socio-political identities. This is the subject of her book Identidades imaginadas: Biografía y nacionalidad en el horizonte de la guerra (Cuba 1860-1898) and of her current book-length project "Riddles of Modern Identity: Biography and Visual Portraiture in Slaveholding Cuba (1760-1886)." She is the author of numerous essays that address the interconnections between queer sexualities, gender and anti-colonial politics in twentieth-century Puerto Rico. For the past two decades she has served on the advisory board of the Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage Project, and is co-editor of Herencia. The Anthology of Hispanic Literature of the United States, En otra voz. Antología de la literatura hispana de los Estados Unidos, and Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage, vol. V.
 
This lecture is free and open to the public.

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Linford D. Fisher
Assistant Professor of History
Brown University

Indian Slavery in Early America:
What Happened to Enslaved New England Indians?


Tuesday, October 28
John Hope Franklin Room
Social Sciences 224
1126 East 59th Street
4:30pm. Reception to follow.

As recent scholarship is beginning to show, Indians were enslaved in early America by the tens of thousands. In New England, Indians were enslaved as a result of warfare in the seventeenth century; most males were sent “out of the country.” But where, in fact, did they go? Join Professor Fisher on a journey to various Caribbean archives to try to find archival traces of enslaved New England Natives.

Linford D. Fisher is the author of The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Cultures (2012) and is currently completing a book entitled The Land of the Unfree: Africans, Indians, and the Varieties of Slavery and Servitude in Colonial New England and the Atlantic World as a fellow at the Newberry Library. His work with Brown undergraduates and researchers to crack the “Roger Williams code” was profiled in Slate and in national and international newspapers and was published in the William and Mary Quarterly and in Decoding Roger Williams: The Lost Essay of Rhode Island’s Founding Father (2014).

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Michael Dawson
John D. MacArthur Professor of Political Science and the College
Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture
University of Chicago
 
Black Politics and the Neoliberal Racial Order
 
Thursday, October 23
Classics 110
1010 East 59th Street
4:30pm. Reception to follow.
 
Michael C. Dawson, one of the nation’s leading experts on race and politics, is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Political Science and the College at the University of Chicago. He has also taught at the University of Michigan and Harvard University.

His research interests have included the development of quantitative models of African American political behavior, identity, and public opinion, the political effects of urban poverty, and African American political ideology. This work also includes delineating the differences in African American public opinion from those of white Americans. More recently he has combined his quantitative work with work in political theory. His books include Behind the Mule: Race and Class in African-American Politics (Princeton, 1994) and Black Visions: The Roots of Contemporary African-American Political Ideologies (Chicago, 2001), which won the Bunche Award from the American Political Science Association, Not in Our Lifetimes: The Future of Black Politics (Chicago, 2011), and Blacks In and Out of the Left (Harvard, 2013). Dawson is currently finishing an edited volume, Fragmented Rainbow, on race and civil society in the United States as well as a solo volume, Black Politics in the Early 21st Century.

He is the founding director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago as well as the founding co-editor (with Lawrence Bobo) of the journal The Du Bois Review (Cambridge University Press). Dawson has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has been interviewed extensively by the print and broadcast media including the Washington Post, The Economist, The Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Chicago Tribune, NPR, CNN, BET, and ABC News.

This lecture is free and open to the public.

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Rosanna Warren
Hanna Holborn Gray Distinguished Professor of Social Thought
University of Chicago
 
Poetry and the City:
Blake, Baudelaire, and Hart Crane

 
Thursday, October 16
Rosenwald 405
1101 East 58th Street
4:30pm. Reception to follow.

Rosanna Warren is an acclaimed poet, whose research interests include translation, literary biography, literature and the visual arts, and relations between classical and modern literature. She is the author of five books of poetry: Ghost in a Red Hat (2011); Departure (2003); Stained Glass (1993), which was named the Lamont Poetry Selection by the Academy of American Poets; Each Leaf Shines Separate (1984); and Snow Day (1981). In addition she has published a translation of Euripides’s Suppliant Women (with Stephen Scully, 1995), has edited The Art of Translation: Voices from the Field (1989), and is the author of a book of literary criticism, Fables of the Self: Studies in Lyric Poetry (2008). Warren is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served as chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. Among her numerous honors are a Pushcart Prize, the Witter Byner Poetry Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a fellowship at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, and the Sara Teasdale Award in Poetry.

This lecture is free and open to the public.

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Alison Winter
Professor of History and the Committee on the Conceptual
and Historical Studies of Science, University of Chicago
 
Self Knowledge in the New Age:
Psycho-Spiritual Adventures in Postwar America

 
Thursday, October 9
Classics 110
1010 East 59th Street
4:30pm. Reception to follow.
 
Alison Winter is Professor of History, a member of the Committee on Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science, and director of the Nicholson Center for British Studies at the University of Chicago. Her interests center on the sciences of mind, and more broadly the human sciences, since the eighteenth century. The author of Mesmerized: Powers of Mind in Victorian Britain (Chicago, 1998) and Memory: Fragments of a Modern History (Chicago, 2012), she is currently working on a variety of topics, including a study of the history of the use of moving images in the human sciences; a history of the controversy over the case of Bridey Murphy in mid twentieth century America, and the history of practices associated with “new age’ movements in the1960s and 70s; and an exploration of the use of the psychological sciences in legal work during the twentieth century, particularly in relation to jurors and witnesses.
 
This lecture is free and open to the public.